Canyon in Edgemont Village

Freedom to lunch at fine restaurants is one benefit of having a flexible schedule. Diners enjoy fine experiences and occasional bargains.

Scott Kidd’s CANYON in Edgemont Village was a recent treat. Chef Kidd has worked in BC’s best restaurants, including Sooke Harbour House and Bishop’s. After long service as Executive Chef of Lift Bar and Grill in Coal Harbour, Kidd opened Canyon.  He brought experience, skill and dedication to local ingredients and sustainable foods.

In 2011, Vancouver Magazine called Edgemont Village a “small tight-knit neighbourhood at the foot of Grouse Mountain” that was part of “the hinterland-ish District of North Vancouver.

Modest population density may have been a challenge for preceding restaurateurs in the area, but Canyon faces a new difficulty. Edgemont Village is experiencing what planners euphemistically call “ongoing development pressures.” That may bode well for the future but, in the present, it means extensive construction. With it, the village suffers traffic disruptions and parking problems in normal business hours.

Tradespeople building these structures are not the typical lunch clientele of white-tablecloth bistros with carefully considered wine lists.

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We began by sharing foie gras parfait, onion relish & toast points. For many, this delectable has fallen out of favour but Gwen and I developed a different view after visiting a French family’s goose farmn in the Dordogne region.

We saw hundreds of geese ranging freely through fragrant walnut orchards and watched la gavage, which is forced feeding that results in no apparent distress for these animals.

The farmer said that geese had to be handled and fed well or product quality would be unacceptable. In fact, the family’s birds live a longer and more comfortable life than most of the poultry sold in Canada.

Chef Kidd gets his Foie Gras from a cage-free producer in the Hudson Valley. The Canyon presentation was almost too pretty.

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House-made onion relish was a sweet accompaniment, flavoured with red wine and balsamic vinegar.

Gwen selected a sandwich and the daily soup of spinach, cauliflower and leeks, seasoned with an interesting touch of curry powder. Multigrain bread was overfilled with shrimps, avocado, tomato & cucumber. Half went home.

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I spent the first half of my life avoiding seafood, but no more, which meant an order of scallops and prawns, organic greens, Grana Padano cheese and a lemon vinaigrette.

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Preparation of this ocean candy is not complicated but anything less than perfect execution turns premium product into undesirable morsels. These were very well cooked: lightly caramelized crust but soft and moist inside.

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The shrimp also had skilled treatment.

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Coffee and a shared dessert followed. It was a lemon flavoured custard mixed with baked meringue crumbles added for texture. The irresistible mixture came with a generous topping of raspberries in whipped cream.

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It was a nice ending to a lunch that was much more exotic than the bowl of homemade tomato soup that was our evening meal.

Lunch for two was about $75 before drinks, taxes and tips.

Author: Norm Farrell

Gwen, a critical care nurse, and I raised three children in North Vancouver. Each lives in this community with our seven grandchildren. I have worked in accounting and financial management and publish IN-SIGHTS.CA with news and commentary about public issues and NOTABLEDISCOVERIES.COM about travel, food and lifestyle subjects

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